Ten best posts of October 2009 on LawDepartmentManagmentBlog

Ten thoughtful posts, with the underlined portion what you should click to read the entire post. I welcome thoughts on these posts.

Online dispute resolution (the double-blind method) and benefits for legal departments (Oct. 20, 2009)

A method not only to resolve amounts to be paid in settlements but also, perhaps, to arrive at a figure for fixed fee services.

Further ruminations on value delivered by law firms (Oct. 21, 2009)

Many posts on value as delivered by law firms, with a metapost to 22 more.

An online decision tree for import/export law, and the potential for similar systems (Oct. 21, 2009)

An expertise system for legal analysis, and thoughts about the opportunity for legal departments to develop them collectively.

Why law firms agree to volume discounts and thus the leverage legal departments enjoy (Oct. 22, 2009)

Nine explanations for this ubiquitous payment model.

Four techniques — staffing models — when you manage a law firm on a matter (Oct. 22, 2009)

Who works on your matters makes all the difference, so consider several methods of managing that group.

Free benchmark report; total legal spend per regional lawyer compared for EMEA and Asia-Pacific (Oct. 22, 2009)

Email me if you would like a copy of the 2009 Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) benchmark survey or the Asia-Pacific (APAC) survey. Plus some inter-regional comparisons on metrics.

Drawbacks of a separate group that only audits and reviews bills (Oct. 25, 2009)

Problems abound with teams that only fly-speck invoices from law firms.

Principal determinants of the number of direct reports to a general counsel (Oct. 27, 2009)

My blook on law department structure covers several of these factors that shape legal departments.

Definition of a strategic plan and some implications for general counsel (Oct. 29, 2009)

Clarity on what constitutes a useful strategic plan.

Shortcomings of the ubiquitous benchmark metric, lawyers per billion of revenue (Oct. 30, 2009)

The metric shows up everywhere, but it is far from bulletproof.

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